celeste

Σεργιάνι στον κόσμο

42 posts in this topic

Well, that's a strange sentence I wrote (in Topic Description) but I never know what to put in that place.

I finally got a printer :) and could make a print of the booklets of this CD. Thanks to those who translated them.

I think this album is a cultural curiosity indeed. (noone ever did something like that in Portugal, like describing in songs the moorish occupation, the spanish one). What I find interesting indeed is that songs can really bring you a totally new historical, sociological and cultural universe! How much one can learn! I'm particularly thinking about Yangos Noulas whom I had never heard of and how this songs makes the connection with other freedom fighters of other times.

Well, I hope this wasn't too ignorant. :)

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I must say that I was more impressed by the musical and poetical beauty of some of the songs of this album than by their cultural background...

Are you going to believe me if I tell you that I don't appreciate Markopoulos very much, except when he is sung by Lakis Halkias, Nikos Xilouris, Giorgos Dalaras, and the two songs Sotiria Bellou recorded...

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Are you going to believe me if I tell you that I don't appreciate Markopoulos very much, except when he is sung by Lakis Halkias, Nikos Xilouris, Giorgos Dalaras, and the two songs Sotiria Bellou recorded...

François, of course, that goes without saying. The musical and poetical beauty of some of the songs also impressed me but I'm trying to see if people give their opinion, and if I just said I like it a lot, maybe the conversation wouldn't go far.

As for the rest, I'll take your word on that, I don't know any of them...

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one of the most beautiful songs of Giorgos...especially in "Live" recordings...it's amazing what this song make in the crowed..and what it's doing to me every time...!

that's why i agree wuth Celeste...it make "Electrical" wave in my heart and back!!!

and i also don't appreciate Markopoulos so much...except of the songs Dalaras did...

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Celeste, about your remark 'no one ever did anything like that in Portugal'. There is something special about Greek music in that respect, which the Greeks probably don't notice, since they are "inside" it.

A little story.... Two years ago, I started to translate Dalaras songs (this being the only way to find out what I wanted to know, i.e. what he was saying) and of course, doing that, translating, I learned (some) Greek. But even back then, a friend who was helping me remarked: "you are not learning Greek , you are learning Greece !" . This was because I kept fishing for the historical and geografical and social facts referred to in the songs. Which means that the first purchase, after the dictionary, was a map - check the translation topic about Didimoteicho blues, that's when.

From then on, I kept finding that you can learn in contemporary song about practically every aspect of Greece. From ancient history (e.g.: "Dimosthinous lekseis" on the Attikon album) to recent history (e.g. Mikra Asia) and in between ('Sergiani ston kosmo'). Also geografy (I honestly believe there is no place-name on the map of Greece that does not appear in a song somewhere). Also plants and animals - we've had translation discussions about swallows, about sharks, about marigolds, about peaches... And so on, and so forth.

Now, I don't know anything about Portugese musical tradition, except the fact that there is a lot of it, and that when I heard any I always liked it (until now), and that I never know what I'm hearing which annoys me. But I do know a little about the (folk) music traditions in other european countries. Not much, but enough to state with confidence that the Scots and the Irish have heaps of songs with exactly the kind of themes in Sergiani ston Kosmo. Put the English in place of the Turks or the Catellans, and there you are. The difference is that in Great Britain, they no longer make songs in this way, about these aspects of their history. You'll still find some historical and/or geografical references in today's british laika (british laika? e.g., Dalaras calls Sting a british laiko musician and I totally agree with him). You'll find some. but not much, and they don't come from the tradition that produced "Mull of Kintyre" or "Parcel of rogues". They are re-introduced, like extinct animal species.

And this is what is so special about Greek music. It has a continuous, uninterrupted tradition. Yes, there are changes, even revolutions, of a kind, but not total breaks, not incompatibilities. We are, each and every one of us, the child not only of our parents, but of our time.

I owe this insight to Jung, and I see it come true all the time, all over everywhere.

Now, strangely, if you look at the music produced today, it seems to be either/or. Either a product of the "parents" (that is "classical" music, as in symphony orchestras) OR a product of "this time" (where the "generation time" is about a decade, that is, if you grew up in the eighties you don't as a rule like seventies music, for example - or nineties music - yes I know about exceptions, but I'm talking about the general music consumption pattern).

Except in Greece.

I remember my utter, blank astonishment at finding that my friends, nineteen, twenty years old, went to concerts with their parents, and you couldn't tell who was singing most passionately. Of course it's not eve-ry-bo-dy, but the simple fact that it can occur was a revelation to me. And last week on Lycavitos I saw them dancing, following Marinella's cue (Dalaras didn't, he ran away, litterally, but that's another story). Dancing: some where about 16, some were about my age, some were 60 or so. Yes I know Marinella is an exception too, but again, I defy you to find anything like this in any other contemporary music. On this scale.

What I'm trying to explain (sorry to be so wordy about it)... Greek music today is still the child of its parents, unlike music in any other country that I know of. The songs still do ALL that songs did for centuries: "we learned more from a three-minute record than we'd ever learned in school" (as the song says). And they are still for everyone, not just for an efemerous generation of 5 or 10 years.

But I am afraid that this is not going to last very much longer.

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Don't be afraid of being wordy, it's quite refreshing to have you back and say interesting things like that. What you say about the way youngsters in Greece feel the music, I absolutely agree. I think we talked about it once by messenger. Here when my students make fun with fado and Amália, I answer them - though I'm not a great fado listener, not that I don't like it but that, well, I think it should be listened on special occasions - as I was saying I answer them that this is the kind of music that made our country special, like flamenco for Spain, etc., so it's our cultural heritage and it is something that has contributed to make us what we are, or better said, that explains our soul as a nation.

What you say about the Scots' and Irish' tradition is very true, I was speaking of Portugal, but I guess there isn't one nation in the world that didn't suffer massacres, invasions, wars. It's part of mankind's general history. :razz:

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...though I'm not a great fado listener, not that I don't like it but that, well, I think it should be listened on special occasions - as I was saying I answer them that this is the kind of music that made our country special, like flamenco for Spain, etc., so it's our cultural heritage...

The point I was trying to emfazise is the relationship between a "heritage" ( which is what makes us the children of our parents,) and the living tradition (which is what we make ourselves, now, in our time). In most countries, they have separated almost completely, the generation gap is immense, not just in music.

In Portugal, the people who listen to Portugese music are a small sub-group of the music-consuming public, right? Most people who listen to music daily don't consider 'portugese' a compliment when applied to music? But in Greece, there is Greek music for everyone, anyone, all tastes and ages. There _still_ is - for how much longer??

... but I guess there isn't one nation in the world that didn't suffer massacres, invasions, wars. It's part of mankind's general history. :razz:  

and it's a fact, I think it's probably biological, that people turn their suffering into works of art, and it helps them to cope with them. Scotland is a brilliant case in point: it's the English that won the battles, but the Scots who made the best songs about them!

I've been asking myself if people like Theodorakis and Loizos would have reached such immense artistic heights without the oppression they lived under. They would always have been great artists, inevitably, but SO great? Oppression was a stimulating factor, not just to their creativity, but also, think of it, to how receptive the public was...

Well-fed, subsidized, contented peoples do not bring forth the greatest art (statistically, so far).

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In Portugal, the people who listen to Portugese music are a small sub-group of the music-consuming public, right? Most people who listen to music daily don't consider 'portugese' a compliment when applied to music?

I have to answer in 2 posts for I don't know how to make 2 separated quotes. :D

In fact, in Portugal, people do listen to Portuguese music, but not so much the traditional one, like fado. I must add, however, that the fado tradition is not so much from the North, where I live, but much more from the center - Coimbra - and the South - Lisbon. Like we don't have bull fights here, and we don't eat snails like they do. It doesn't mean that fado isn't appreciated here, it is, but usually by older generations. It is true that there is a gap between older and younger generations and that this gap is not so wide in Greece, and that's a good thing. I hope it will remain like this for a long time. I just notice that if you don't like trendy things or groups, you're catalogued immediately. Nighthawk says I'm old because I like jazz! :razz:

And people here find me really weird for enjoying this really bizarre music which is how the greek sound appears to them. You can't imagine how people make jokes about it. But - I'm gonna translate from Portuguese, tell me if you have an equivalent expression in English: it goes in at 100 and goes out at 200, which as a matter of fact means, I don't give a...damn! (let's be polite!)

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[and it's a fact, I think it's probably biological, that people turn their suffering into works of art, and it helps them to cope with them. They would always have been great artists, inevitably, but SO great? Oppression was a stimulating factor, not just to their creativity, but also, think of it, to how receptive the public was...

Well-fed, subsidized, contented peoples do not bring forth the greatest art (statistically, so far).

That's an interesting concept. Does suffering make better works of art? As a matter of fact, I think so. There is always a part of suffering: fado, flamenco, blues, negro spirituals...you name it. Creating is painful and very few artists, in a wide sense, were happy in their lives. I guess suffering with a good dosis of artistic sensibility made the greatest works. That would be a good theme to debate on but I have to work. Not artistically! It would be great to hear what other members think about it, as well. :razz:

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 ... to hear what other members think about it, as well. :razz:

here is one opinion:

- Πότε κάποιος είναι σε θέση να απολαύσει την πραγματική τέχνη;

- Όταν αποδέχεται την τέχνη, ανακαλύπτει τον πόνο και το άχθος αυτών που την παρήγαγαν.

Δεν υπάρχει τέχνη χωρίς πόνο, τίποτα δεν μπορεί να γίνει χωρίς πόνο - και αυτό που σας λέω είναι ουσιαστικό.

Ακόμα και ο χορευτής πονάει για να χορέψει.

Τίποτα δεν γίνεται τυχαία.

- When does a person reach the point where they make real, true art?

- [Real] art, when it is displayed, reveals the pain and the grief of those who created it.

Art does not exist without pain, nothing comes into existence without pain - and what I'm saying here is touches the essence.

Even the dancer suffers pain in order to dance.

Nothing happens gratuitously.

(Dalaras interviewed by Thanasis Lalas, see http://www.dalaras.com/forum/index.php?s=5...16&t=1167&st=60  

I guess he knows what he's talking about.

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Two thingies:

a) Celeste, Celeste, so do I say you're old because you listen to jazz? Don't forget to add I say it in a jokingly manner... :razz: And, oh, btw, don't forget to add that you listen to jazz oldies. But I digress a little... Jazz is for all ages, anybody who's interested. Personally, I like live jazz and find recorded jazz... interesting. But if I really meant it when I said it, then I'd only be listening to the latest whatever on the market...

b ) As for suffering... I believe this has already been spoken of previously but let my add my two cents worth if I may. Everybody suffers. Suffering being an intense sort of feeling may thus easily lead to art. What I mean is what do you really think of as "suffering"? Because it may be simply about intensity and globally named "suffering" by someone, as in suffering to give birth to a new being. But there was pleasure too, let's not forget that. There isn't only suffering, there is (thankfully) a whole plethora of intense feelings which go from terrible to ecstatic through very many nuances. And they all, being intense, may lead to creativity and to art. Not all good art is about suffering, is it? Very much on the contrary, many times, it can be about feelings of great inner peace and other positive ones. So... I really don't know how to interpret Dalaras's words. What does he mean by that (possibly) global word suffering? I bet he may mean more than just that. On the other hand, if he doesn't, well, he's in his own right... But great pleasure (together with suffering) can be had by giving birth to a new song, new lyrics, by performing it in front of others, by recording it (which can be quite boring but still interesting when the final result is, at least, satisfactory), by the memories it may bring (even bad memories are sometimes nostalgic, go figure!). To cut it short, most artists aren't masochists nor people who suffer more than most. They suffer and rejoice like everybody else but know how to give it an "artistic" shape. It's more interesting to make art inspired by what we observe and the peculiar way we view it than to mainly center our attention in ourselves and our little sufferings. Is suffering a good inspiration source? Certainly so. But not alone. Fortunately. Or art would become dull and depressing. Instead, it is like life: varied.

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There isn't only suffering, there is (thankfully) a whole plethora of intense feelings which go from terrible to ecstatic through very many nuances.

Ever tried having one without the other? To experience intense pleasure, without knowing intense pain? Forget it. Again, it's biology: if you are sensitive, you are sensitive to both...

Anyway.

I was NOT referring to suffering as a source of inspiration. If you noticed, I spoke not just of the effect on the artist, but also on his public. Would the public have been so receptive to Theodorakis, to Loizos, would they have had such dire need of them, without the dictatorship?

If you'll allow the metafor, suffering seems to function as a drill, piercing, that allows the source of inspiration to flow.

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Well, well... Of course, you're perfectly right. And so am I. :razz:

It's just that I, personally, both as an artist and an art consumer, like to think of art as a coin of multiple sides... As I'm sure it is.

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Although suffering may not be the only emotion, it certainly is the most universal. There are some people who never experience real joy. Perhaps there are some who have never been hurt, either. Generally, we tend to dislike such people, whom we classify as bubbly bimbos or rich good-for-nothing brats. I'm not saying that is acceptable (I consider it rude), but the point is that we find familiarity in pain and passion by purging through music. Paraponemena Logia is the greatest tribute to suffering I've yet come across. I'm amazed by how simple yet powerful the song is, but melodically and lyrically; it is a snail that moves mountains. I don't know if any of you has ever tried to sing along, but it is the most difficult of any Dalaras song (that I've heard--and excepting perhaps Thelo Na Ta Po) because it is not just a matter of notes but raw anger and desperate despair. All in three sentences. Amazing.

On another note, Dalaras was very much right, I assure you, in his interpretation of art. Although I wouldn't go so far as to say that all artistic achievements are projections of pain--because there are some "happy" paintings and whatnot out there--the most memorable works create an emotional response, the most readily available of which is suffering. Emotion is the key to creation. Dalaras could not sing well without it. I would be a very crummy Greek dancer. Music is moving, and we either flow with it or stand dumbly on stage until we pee our pants.

I suppose that all had already been said, but I like to add my voice to others'. Good topic. Goodnight.

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Paraponemena Logia is the greatest tribute to suffering I've yet come across.

I'd rather say "one the greatest tributes to suffering people... :) It is a great song, indeed...

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On another note, Dalaras was very much right, I assure you, in his interpretation of art.  Although I wouldn't go so far as to say that all artistic achievements are projections of pain--because there are some "happy" paintings and whatnot out there--the most memorable works create an emotional response, the most readily available of which is suffering.  Emotion is the key to creation.  Dalaras could not sing well without it.  I would be a very crummy Greek dancer.  Music is moving, and we either flow with it or stand dumbly on stage until we pee our pants.

I suppose that all had already been said, but I like to add my voice to others'.  Good topic.  Goodnight.

There you said it, Antometrios. Emotion with honesty and talent. No dumbness. The ability to feel and make the audience believe it is truly felt. I agree with everything you said ( though the pants part is an emotional response I could live without :) )

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"Sergiani ston kosmo" is an excellent work.All the songs are very good.But I think "Enas aponos aeras" is one of the best Dalaas' songs.The sound of tzouras in the begining of this song makes me..shiver.

" Enas aponos aeras m' exei ferei os edo

kai sto girisma ti meras eipa na se ksanado...."

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(www.politis-news.com)

ΜΕΓΑΛΟΙ ΔΙΣΚΟΙ

Σεργιάνι στον κόσμο

Γιάννης Μαρκόπουλος

1979

***

Το 1979 είναι μια χρονιά που παρότι κυκλοφόρησαν πέραν των 500 δίσκων, διαχρονικά έχουν αντέξει ελάχιστοι και συγκεκριμένα 5!!! Πράγμα που καταδεικνύει ότι δεν άλλαξαν και πολύ τα πράγματα τα τελευταία 30 τουλάχιστον χρόνια. Βέβαια εδώ θα πρέπει να πούμε ότι από το χώρο της δημοτικής μουσικής κυκλοφόρησαν δίσκοι της Δώρας Στράτου και του ΣΔΕΜ με καλύτερο "Τα τραγούδια της Θεσσαλίας 1", που όμως είναι δυσεύρετοι. Γενικά όμως η δισκογραφία κινήθηκε και πάλι με επανεκδόσεις, ορχηστρικά, συλλογές, παλιά λαϊκά, ελαφρολαϊκά, "τουριστικά", δημοτικά και βεβαίως οι καθιερωμένες νέες κυκλοφορίες των εμπορικών τραγουδιστών της εποχής. Ο Γιάννης Μαρκόπουλος αυτή τη χρονιά εμφανίζεται με ένα κύκλο τραγουδιών που θυμίζει τον παλιό καλό Μαρκόπουλο του "Χρονικού", της "Θητείας" και της "Ιθαγένειας". Χωρίς να διαφοροποιεί το γνωστό του ύφος με μια πολυμελή ορχήστρα από παραδοσιακά και μη όργανα, χορωδία και εξαιρετικές ερμηνείες από τον Γιώργο Νταλάρα, αναμιγνύει τους ήχους της παράδοσης με το αστικό λαϊκό τραγούδι και προχωρεί σε επιβλητικές ενορχηστρώσεις που σε παραπέμπουν στο ούτω καλούμενο "πολιτικοκοινωνικό τραγούδι". Ο δίσκος χωρίστηκε σε ενότητες και τα επιμέρους τραγούδια εξυπηρετούσαν το κυρίως θέμα της κάθε ενότητας που δεν ήταν άλλο από την πάλη ενάντια στη λήθη, στην κάθε μορφή εξουσίας και σκλαβιάς και βεβαίως στο "μεγαλείο" της καταγωγής των Ελλήνων. Με άλλα λόγια, ο δίσκος σαφώς έστελνε και πάλι συνειρμικά μηνύματα που απέρρεαν από το πολιτιστικό σλόγκαν του Μαρκόπουλου "Επιστροφή στις Ρίζες". Το στιχουργικό μέρος ανέλαβαν κυρίως οι στιχουργοί Πάνος Θεοδωρίδης και Μάνος Ελευθερίου, συμμετείχαν όμως στιχουργικά και οι Γιάννης Μαρκόπουλος, Σαπιέντιας και Μελέτης Κυριάκου. Μαζί με τον Νταλάρα τραγούδησαν οι Γιούλη Τσίρου και Βασιλική Λαβίνα. Από το δίσκο ξεχώρισαν τα τραγούδια "Η μάνα του Αλέξανδρου", "Παραπονεμένα λόγια" και ο "Σκλάβος»

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8anash s'euxaristoume gia tis plhrofories pou esteiles.

Par'olo pou kapoia tragoudia eginan epituxies, ligoi gnwrizoun tis leptomereies oson afora ta tragoudia kai ton logo gia ton opoion grafthkan.

:)

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Να βρίσκαμε κι εκείνη τη συναυλία του Γ.ΜΑΡΚΟΠΟΥΛΟΥ που πρωτοπαρουσιάστηκε το "ΣΕΡΓΙΑΝΙ ΣΤΟΝ ΚΟΣΜΟ" και είχε δείξει τότε η ΕΡΤ... Ειδικά εκείνο το "ΕΛΛΑΔΑ (ΛΕΝΓΚΩ-ΛΕΝΓΚΩ)" με τον ΝΤΑΛΑΡΑ στο φινάλε ήταν το κάτι άλλο... :)

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I stumbled on this topic accidentally while searching for some information - and thought I might have something to add (although it's 3! years old, and half of the participants - unfortunately - don't show up anymore :( )

Considering the above, it makes no sense to make quotes.

Basically, the eternal questions were discussed that can be all combined in a phrase: art-life relationship. Non-ending type of discussion - which makes it the more interesting for someone to fight boredom or depression :) (not me - it's my lunchtime :blush: )

One participant said before that suffering (example: modern Greek history) might explain recent blossoming of musical culture in this country, and might be generally a good soil to grow works of art... Another disagreed saying that creation is an act of joy.

Well, I still better include a quote:

Suffering being an intense sort of feeling may thus easily lead to art. What I mean is what do you really think of as "suffering"? Because it may be simply about intensity and globally named "suffering" by someone, as in suffering to give birth to a new being.

I don't know how much God suffered while creating this world but he seemed to proceed with a great joy and said that "it's good!". Well, it obviously came out not THAT good, with the consequence that we all had to pick up from there and participate in the act of creation - each in our own peculiar way, but ALL of us.

What I mean that creativity is hardwired in the Homo Sapiens. (There is a book "The Language Instinct" by an author who argues that we all have a hardwired language instinct from our birth - I would put the instrinct of creativity into the same category).

We all participate in the creation even while listening. It was very well said recently how a listener felt he was participating:

Και το κυριότερο, με τέτοιο τρόπο, που ένιωθα να μου μεταδίδει το πάθος και την ένταση αυτών των επικών τραγουδιών και να με κάνει να νιώθω ότι συμμετέχω κι εγώ.

And creation is a joyful act - to make the point more relevant to this forum: look at the face of Dalaras when he is singing even the most serious or saddest pieces - you'll see this Gioconda smile on his face. :pity:

As for the suffering - there is no need to suffer or even have a life experience, as a matter of fact, in order to be creative. How else could you explain child prodigies: Mozart, Shostakovich, your own children - who are obviously geniuses :rolleyes:

On the other hand, prolonged suffering makes people not creative - but dull and evil (sometimes), spreading thair pain down along the chain to other people... (read Dickens).

Suffering is not inspiration (as Geske already said somewhere in this topic) unless:

1) it leads to fighting, i.e. activity or

2) it rids the sufferer from his ego (meaning self-conciousness, illusions) and takes him close to the origins - his own (when he was a child, maybe), those of the universe (lost due to all those social wrappings we acquired in the course of life).

Some people need a big bang of grief to get back to reality and become more perceptive to important things (Zen teachers would even give to a pupil an actual bang to make him more perceptive :lol: ). This kind of suffering is just a way to shake such people back into the natural (creative) state of happiness = openness to the kosmos (therefore, not by making them dull, but by making them to look at the world at a different angle).

Someone said that life only starts when you have suffered, shed your ego, lost illusions, moved from the center of the universe to settle down in a more balanced and contemplative spot and with thinner and more perceptive skin - although the process of acquiring and shedding illusions never stops, I guess... (still in the process of getting rid of some acquired while visiting this forum :pity: )

As for the many artistic people being unhappy in their life, a point mentioned before - the urge to creation can be so powerful that family and friends get often sacrificed in the process. That leads also to an interesting point about compassion which is an opposite to creation (in my humble view): it's missing from the God's creation - how many Mother Theresas we have in comparison with Beethovens and Theodorakises? Artists are cruel, jelous and competitive, the same as the rest of us (regardless of how perceptive we are to their works). We are mostly compassionate to ourselves - an extreme example: look at a mourner who lost someone. What is he saying in his grief? "Why did you leave ME alone..."

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Από την τρίτομη "Ιστορία του ελληνικού τραγουδιού"(εκδ. ΚΕΔΡΟΣ) του Κώστα Μυλωνά :

"Με το "Σεργιάνι στον κόσμο" ο Μαρκόπουλος επανέρχεται σε δρόμους οικείους και γνώριμους, λιγότερο απαιτητικούς, αλλά ωστόσο, όχι και τόσο εύκολους για να τους διαβείς με άνεση και επιτυχία. Το "Σεργιάνι στον κόσμο" είναι μια ισορροπημένη δουλειά του συνθέτη, που αποτελείται από μια σειρά τραγούδια χωρισμένα σε τέσσερις ενότητες. Απ' αυτά ξεχωρίζουν : "Του χάρου", "και "Η μάνα του Αλέξανδρου" σε στίχους Πάνου Θεοδωρίδη και "Παραπονεμένα λόγια" και "Ένας άπονος αέρας" σε στίχους Μάνου Ελευθερίου. Ωστόσο και τα υπόλοιπα τραγούδια δεν είναι αδιάφορα. Γενικά, πρόκειται για μια φροντισμένη κι επιμελημένη δουλειά με καλή ενορχήστρωση, ωραίες μελωδίες και κυρίως θαυμάσια ερμηνεία του Γιώργου Νταλάρα.". *

* τόμος 3, σελ. 111-112

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* Από το κείμενο του Γιώργου Νοταρά "Ο Γιάννης Μαρκόπουλος σε ... χίλιες λέξεις"(περιοδικό "ΔΙΦΩΝΟ", τεύχος 142, Ιούλης 2007, σελ. 53) :

"Το Σεργιάνι Στον Κόσμο ήταν το 1979 μια ακόμα στροφή(Σ.Σ. για τον συνθέτη Μαρκόπουλο), που γνώρισε μνημειώδη επιτυχία".

** Από το ένθετο του, συνοδευτικού του 142ου τεύχους του "ΔΙΦΩΝΟΥ", CD "ΓΙΑΝΝΗΣ ΜΑΡΚΟΠΟΥΛΟΣ - 50 ΧΡΟΝΙΑ ΣΥΝΕΧΟΥΣ ΔΗΜΙΟΥΡΓΙΑΣ - ΑΝΘΟΛΟΓΗΜΑ 2007 ΜΕ ΤΡΑΓΟΥΔΙΑ ΤΟΥ"(κείμενο : Αλέξανδρου Στουπάκη/μουσικολόγου) :

"Το 1979 ο Γιάννης Μαρκόπουλος συνθέτει το Σεργιάνι Στον Κόσμο, κύκλο τραγουδιών σε τέσσερις ενότητες, με ερμηνευτή τον Γιώργο Νταλάρα.

Ο δίσκος έκανε εκατοντάδες χιλιάδες αντίτυπα και μια από τις επιτυχίες του, τα Παραπονεμένα Λόγια, κυριάρχησε ως λαϊκός ύμνος σε όλο τον ελληνισμό, που ανελλιπώς τραγουδιέται όπως και πριν από τριάντα χρόνια.".

-Από το, ίδιο, παραπάνω ένθετο :

"Η Μάνα του Αλέξανδρου, μια από τις μεγάλες επιτυχίες που περιέχεται στο δίσκο Σεργιάνι Στον Κόσμο.".

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