navas

Dalaras' unfairly judged songs

30 posts in this topic

I listen to (and sing) O Palios Stratiotis whenever I'm in a very low mood. I can only base my view on the English translation of the song, but I think it is not about suicide at all, as some have suggested.

Your fears and my fears

On the same table

Between them our poison

Sweet like syrup

And within it

Melting like sugar

The star our love

First etched on our arms.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but "heri" means both arms and hands. The star of their love I see as wedding rings, "etched" (being worn) on their hands (not arms). The scene is one of a married couple sitting together, I think, perhaps just looking at each other, considering their "fears"--issues, concerns, problems, etc.--that have come between them like a poison. It seems almost as though this poison--this separation--would be a sweet alternative to sitting in silence while their fears dissolve their desire for one another.

You are not promising me life

And I can't work miracles

But if you asked me

To die for you my heart

Like an old soldier

I would die a second death

A better one this time

For you my love

Now, maybe I'm just being very obscure, but marriage may be viewed as the death of an individual and also as his rebirth as one joined to another. So, if they are married, than that could have been the first death that he suffered. Yet it has led them to this table where they sit and consider the future, hasn't it? So nothing seems to be turning out very well. The speaker thus assures his wife that he's still willing, if she is, to remain together. He'll bite his pride and offer himself up to her once again if it means a resurrected relationship.

And if there still remains

Even a half-ruined sense

Among these ruins

I'll stay with you

Until spring comes

To spur us on

And bring new life

To the reign of death

His reasoning seems to be, as I said earlier, that they remains the smallest glimmer of hope. He's willing to stay with her and to nurture that hope until they feel their love live again.

I hope that makes sense, but hey--the great thing about poetry is that there isn't necessarily a correct interpretation. Just judging from how the music goes from slow and mournful (like a funeral march) to beautiful and strong (I might even suggest, heavenly) and also from the lyrics--it is my personal opinion that this song is one about the death and death's destruction by love.

I apologize for changing the topic.

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This is the "official" translation from the "Running roads" book, I think.

I have a better one sitting around somewhere waiting to be typed - thanks to our fellow forum-member Gazakas - no thanks to my laziness.

Watch the translation forum - just one advance note: "echted" is quite simply a mis-translation, so don't base any understanding on that.

ps.

not that it matters all that much when he's singing.

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It's funny that I just stumbled across this topic because I've recently fallen in love with the album Methysmena Tragoudia and am listening to it right now.

Here's a song that deserves more attention: STON PEIRAIA. It's one of my all time favorites.

Also, from Oi Maides I Oilioi Mou, STIN ANATOLI STI DYSI. I can understand why it might not be sung at a typical concert without proper orchestration, but why he didn't perform this with the Israel Philharmonic I can't bring myself to contemplate. It's just so unbearably beautiful (listen to the counterpoint between Dalaras' voice and the violins during the line "για χάρη σου τι τράβηξα").

(Incidendly, the title track of Methysmena Tragoudia is my least favorite on the album, but that's just a matter of personal taste. Of course, all of this has been a matter of personal taste.)

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(Incidendly, the title track of Methysmena Tragoudia is my least favorite on the album, but that's just a matter of personal taste. Of course, all of this has been a matter of personal taste.)

:music:

hi there Andometrios

you mean to tell me you didn't like the title song??

:blink:

Man I'm for one to say thats the best song on the whole cd/

:razz:

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Well, it's probably more a matter of my disliking the orchestration than the song itself. I've been trying for some time now to overcome a prejudice against Greek songs that don't sound "Greek" to me. Some of my fondest childhood memories were of my church's summer festival that featured old bouzouki music. Years later when I began taking an active interest in Greek composers and singers, I found myself drawn to traditional-sounding songs like "Tou Votanikou O Magkas" and "Stin Alana." "Methysmena Tragoudia"--while not sounding bad, by any means--doesn't appeal to me without some effort on my part to appreciate it.

On the other hand, it took me a long time to appreciate "Paraponemena Logia" and many other rembetika songs, too. So, I'm willing to put in the effort. :razz:

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