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Geske

Κόκκινο τριαντάφυλλο

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I've just heard the song called 'Kokkino Triantafilo' for what I THOUGHT was the first time.

But it sounded so familiar that I'm wondering, is it famous for some reason, so that I may have heard it before?

Or is just that the tune is so very, very catching?

(great song by the way).

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Geeske, I do not know if this is a reason that the song is famous but anyway I would like to mention that it was written on occasion the death of Alekos Panagoulis.

As you love books you will know Oriana Fallaci and perhaps her book "A man" (if this is the correct english title). If you read it (and I think that everyone interested in the political and social situation of Greece in the late 1960ies and 1970ies should do this) you will learn a lot about Alekos Panagoulis.

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And to think I never new for whom the song had been written! I've read the book of course. Michael what would we do without you ? You're a real encyclopedia. Many thanks!

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Thank you for your nice words, Annemarie, but it is simply coincidence that sometimes I know a certain detail. I do not even remember where I read for the first time that the song is dedicated to Panagoulis. The strange thing is that this detail is not mentioned on the records (neither on the cover of the LP nor on that of the CD).

(Edited by Michael at 10:12 pm on Aug. 17, 2001)

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The song is the #11 on "Οι μεγαλυτερεσ επιτυχιεσ του" 1987. Indeed it is written by Theodorakis after the death in 1977 of Panagoulis.

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Michael is true. And another song written for Alekos Panagoulis is the song"Ekeinos itan monos", which was on a small record of 45" and the other side was "kokkino triantafill", both by Dalaras. This small record was released in 1976 and then Kokkino triantafillo was put in "Oi Maides oi hlioi mou" and "Ekeinos itan monos" in "Gia ta tragoudia ki ego fteo", 1993.

Geeske, I do believe it was the 1st time you heard it. I had exactly the same feeling when I first heard this song, being a 12 years old boy.

Soc, Panagoulis was killed in an "accident" in 1976 and not in 1977.

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Hi all

 Geeske, Nikolas

I also like the song  titled

' Ekeinos Htan Moni '

from the cd  'Gia ta Tragoudia Fteio Eyo'

trayoudia apr tis 45 strofes.

This song was written by Theodorakis and was suppose to be included in the album

"H Maides OI HLioi Moy, but was disregarded as they did not have enough room to place it on there.

 Here You'll notice the melody is composed & structured simarly to that of

 Kokkino Triantafillo.

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Christo!!!!!

I must be growing up. It was not Sarantapixos but Ekeinos itan monos that was for Alekos Panagoulis. My post is the same, only the song title is different...

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Hey, great!

Michael, you goldmine, thanks for the tip. You've tickled the bookworm... I know Fallacci and the book you refer to but haven't read it, and will do so soon.

The tune of 'kokkino triantaffilo' is really, really special! There are very few songs that give this instant recognition, that sound like they've litteraly been around all the time.

About Theodorakis... I'm all surprised...

However hard one tries, preconceptions WILL get in the way. Theodorakis, now, was down in my books as Composer, capital C, serious, even slightly highbrow. Yes, this is an injustice, but I live on a mudflat at the end of the world and here, the poor man is confined to serious concert halls! I love the concert halls, but not the confinement!!

So I'm over the moon with these veryVERY singable tunes that suddenly (miraculously) turned up in my cd-player - the red rose, and the one called vrechei sto ftochoyiotonia (doesn't that mean 'it's raining on the slum' or something like that?). He can do Great Works and he can do terrific tunes to sing while washing up - honour him next to Verdi!

And the funniest part of it that I was discovering this for myself, at the same time as I deciphered bits of mr Papadopoulos' article ('links' topic) on 'Theodorakis' magic' where he says something similar (as far as I can make out) (and of course he says it much better).

Is it a Greek thing to put sad stories to gay tunes?

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