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vitaly2

Translation humour

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Since this is an international forum , people might want to exchange such stories, even if not directly connected to musical matters?

Although the following story is not about music - but I recalled it by association with the discussion about the song Klirothika - it is about drawing, more exactly about voting events that happened in my old country recently.

Politicians in Ukraine, newly independent from the old "oppressor " Russia, became inspired by their nationalistic pride to the extent of wanting to remove all possible traces of "oppression" including the Russian language. In the course of recent voting campaign they were overwelmed by a huge task of translating all voting documents into Ukrainian - in many Russian-speaking regions that are culturally close to Russia (it's about a third of the polulation, I think).

To complete this task, a computer program for machine translation was generated. Everything has worked fine - with the exception of several voting districts where the program was used by mistake for translation of the lists of registered voters!. What happened: about 75000 voters could not find their names in the bulletins and so could not cast their votes.

Because their names were translated into Ukrainian: for example, using a parallel with English-Greek - someone with the last name "Sparrow" turned out as "Spourgitis" in the list! Smith became "Sideras", etc. etc. :inlove:

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For a good joke on me, follow the story of the translation of the song Κληρώθηκα , from the topic where Christo asks for a translation, and where I delay making it, because the verb in the title is a bother to translate - to the topic where I finally post the translation, with the line that cost me sleepless hours (not quite _nights_, but still...) - and it's wrong! Oh, I know it's all in a day's work, part of the game, and that only people who don't make translations never mistranslate anything, but jeeeeeeez do I hate it...

Thank heaven for Christos (the one from Thessaloniki, not to be confused with the other) who comes and tells me where I went wrong..........

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Translation blanders - or what you read between the lines

This is not exactly about a blander or a mistranslation.

It's rather a misunderstanding, or under-understanding - one of those that fall through the cracks of our conversations every day, every minute.

Whatever they say about the Russian President Vladimir Putin, he is a people's man. He speaks in the people's language rooted in the popular culture.

So, what he said at the yesterday's meeting with the President Bush in Zagreb, according to the today's local paper, is the following:

"Let's be friends, guys, and engage in a honest dialogue".

This phrase intended as a message to Bush and NATO was understood by the commentators as "a striking change from Russia's once-angry threats to target missiles on Western capitals..." etc.

Well, who knows Russian popular culture won't see it as such a striking change. This phrase is being repeated by our famous cartoon character Cat Leopold who is (not unlike a "Russian" bear) a rather peaceful creature always bothered and pestered in the cartoon series by a bunch of rather arrogant and silly mice.

After being patient for a long time, Leopold takes the challenge and punishes the stupid mice easily.

And then he looks at them sadly and declares his famous peace-enticing phrase. Well, mice have a short memory, don't they? Otherwise the cartoon series would not have its weekly sequel.

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