Niki

Dalaras CD songs...

80 posts in this topic

Well, you all, it's me again, if we're by the translations, how could I have forgotten the oldest question I have to the texts Giorgos is  singing! This "Open your window, my beautiful basil..." (Mi mou thimoneis, matia mou....) Should we understand this "basil" as a plant (would be a sophisticated invention of Stavros Kougioumtzis) or something like "my princess"? I want  finally to be absolutely sure about this song  - this is simply a lullaby I grew up with, and my father - my father! is still always almost crying  hearing to this song, althought he knows it already from the very beginning of his passion, just about 25 years. I can't imagine there was once a time without this song, really...

Kali sas nichta oluos (hey, Niki, you promised to try to find Kaiti Xomata for me... Do it if you can, please....

Olga

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Olga you are right, for some songs, we have the idea that they come from 'always, all times'...as for your question, it says the first and it means the second... :mad:

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Aaargh...I don't feel well...

reading your question again, I understood it better..well, it means basil, not any princess...basil grows arund windows..that's all. But the meaning could be prince, not because of thr word but because of the meaning it gives to it. Another older song, traditional, says:

I will become basil in your window...

Next time, I will read posts three times, then I answer...

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Yassou,Nikola,

sou eucharisto para poli! Well, the answer was what I needed... Dare I ask you more? What is exactly the origin and destination of the texts to  the "Ilioscopio" and what does this title exactly  mean?  Is it  a word in "katharevousa"? I couldn't find it in any of my Greek dictionaries, nor did Michalis.

Don't the Greeks really have another word for "mikri patrida"? I would suppose there is one, used in poetry...

One more question, and (perhaps) the last one for today: who was Sotiris Petroulas and Kyrios Lambrakis mentioned by M. Theodorakis in the song sung by M. Farandouri?

Just not, this would be the last: is there any recording of Greek Christmas carols (perhaps not the very traditional ones) sung by Giorgos Dalaras? Or by one of his friends?

Thanks for your patience, Nikola.... Kali sou nichta gia simera!

Olga

PS. Hey, Niki, give me a sign of your existence!

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There was one song missing.... That was Kostalenia 's song... So here it is:

ΚΟΣΤΑΛΕΝΙΑ: ΤΗΝ ΠΟΡΤΑ ΑΝΟΙΓΩ ΤΟ ΒΡΑΔΥ

  Την πόρτα ανοίγω το βράδυ,

  τη λάμπα κρατώ ψηλά,

  να δούνε της γης οι θλιμμένοι,

  να ρθούνε να βρουν συντροφιά.

  Nα βρούνε στρωμένο τραπέζι,

  σταμνί για να πιεί ο καημός,

  κι ανάμεσά μας θα στέκει

  ο πόνος, του κόσμου αδερφός.

  Nα βρούνε γωνιά ν' ακουμπήσουν,

  σκαμνί για να κάτσει ο τυφλός,

  κι εκεί καθώς θα μιλάμε,

  θα ρθει συντροφιά κι ο Χριστός.

KOSTALENIA: THE DOOR I OPEN THE NIGHT

  The door I open the night,

  the lamp I hold up high,

  for the sad people of the earth to see,

  to come and find companionship.

 

  To fing a set table,

  a  water-jug for the grief to drink,

  and in between us there will be,

  the pain, the world's brother.

  To find a corner to lean on,

  a small bench for the blind to sit,

  and there as we will talk,

  Jesus will come along.

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What is exactly the origin and destination of the texts to  the "Ilioscopio" and what does this title exactly  mean?  Is it  a word in "katharevousa"? I couldn't find it in any of my Greek dictionaries, nor did Michalis.

Olga, the texts of this work are taken from a poem collection of Girgos Themelis. This collection is named exactly like this: Ilioskopio. Any dictionary would be much more accurate than me but anyway, ilioskopio is an astronomy tool, a tool that is used specifically to watch the sun.

Don't the Greeks really have another word for "mikri patrida"? I would suppose there is one, used in poetry...

Well, I am not sure if there is any other term but I think that the person who wrote this in the specific song is the one who invented it for the purpose he wanted to use it. reading the rest of the lyrics, I get the impression that the song continually refers to a person as Mikri patrida, probably a patrida only for himself and for noone else, that may make it small. But don't forget that prosaic persons like me can't get in the mind of anyone who writes lyrics. ;)

One more question, and (perhaps) the last one for today: who was Sotiris Petroulas and Kyrios Lambrakis mentioned by M. Theodorakis in the song sung by M. Farandouri?

Which song do you mean? Lambrakis could be several persons. Sotiris Petroulas was a student who was killed in 1965 during some demonstrations in 1965, in Athens. What demonstrations? What a big issue but I don't want to get political. If Theodorakis mentioned both names together, then Lamprakis should probably be Grigoris Lamprakis, member of the greek parliament who was killed in a demonstration again. Both persons, especially Lamprakis, is very strongly connected to big fights for democracy in Greece.

Just not, this would be the last: is there any recording of Greek Christmas carols (perhaps not the very traditional ones) sung by Giorgos Dalaras? Or by one of his friends?

That is an easy one, definately not. But there are others, traditional, which are very interesting!

Apologies for the delay, for some mysterious reason I missed the topic. Thanks to Anna who reminded me... :blush:

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Olga, if it's possible, try to see the movie 'Z' by Costa-Gavras, based on the novel by Vassili Vassilikos and the music is by Theodorakis.

You learn a lot about Greece at that time.

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Micki,

your private messenger box is full und unable to accept any new messages!!!!

Otherwise you'll got my answer!

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OK, here we go.

It's full of holes and some of it doesn't make sense to me, but for what it's worth... please, folk, DO lend a hand! We want this to be a good one, it's the last for the cd booklet. And Kavvadias deserves the best we can do and then some.

ΣΤΑΥΡΟΣ ΤΟΥ ΝΟΤΟΥ

Μουσική: Θάνος Μικρούτσικος

Στίχοι: Νίκος Καββαδίας

Έβραζε το κύμα του γαρμπή

είμαστε σκυφτοί κι οι δυο στο χάρτη

γύρισες και μου 'πες πως το Μάρτη

σ' άλλους παραλλήλους θα 'χεις μπει

Κούλικο στο στήθος σου τατού

που όσο κι αν το καις δε λέει να σβήσει

είπαν πως την είχες αγαπήσει

σε μια κρίση μαύρου πυρετού

Βάρδια πλάι σε κάβο φαλακρό

κι ο Σταυρός του Νότου με τα στράλια

Κομπολόι κρατάς από κοράλλια

κι άκοπο μασάς καφέ πικρό

Το ’λφα του Κενταύρου μια νυχτιά

με το παλλινώριο πήρα κάτου

μου 'πες με φωνή ετοιμοθανάτου

να φοβάσαι τ' άστρα του Νοτιά

’λλοτε απ' τον ίδιον ουρανό

έπαιρνες τρεις μήνες στην αράδα

με του καπετάνιου τη μιγάδα

μάθημα πορείας νυχτερινό

Σ' ένα μαγαζί του Nossi Be

πήρες το μαχαίρι δυο σελίνια

μέρα μεσημέρι απά στη λίνα

ξάστραψες σαν φάρου αναλαμπή

Κάτω στις ακτές της Αφρικής

πάνε χρόνια τώρα που κοιμάσαι

τα φανάρια πια δε τα θυμάσαι

και το ωραίο γλυκό της Κυριακής

Southern Cross

Music: Thanos Mikroutsikous

Lyrics: Nikos Kavvadias

The Garbi wind was whipping the waves

we were bending, the two of us, over the map

you turned and said to me that by March

you would have entered different latitudes

On your chest a κούλικο tattoo

that, however much you burn it, does not consider disappearing

they say that you have loved her [once]

in a crisis of black fever

[or is it: an epidemic of Black Death?]

On watch beside a bald headland

and the Southern Cross [overhead] with its στράλια

You clutch a Komboloi made of coral

and tirelessly swill bitter coffee

Alpha Centauri, one night

with the παλλινώριο [a boat-hook of some kind?], I pulled it down

you spoke to me in a deathly voice

beware the stars of the South

Sometime under that same sky

you spent three months in a row

with the captain's half-caste [woman]

a nightly lesson of running

In a tavern in Nossi Be

you pulled the knife for two shillings

one day at noon across the line [or Line if he means the Equator?]

flashing like a lit-up lighthouse

After the shores of Africa

The years pass by now that you are asleep

The lights, you don't remember them anymore

and the beautiful sweetness of Sunday

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HELP!!!!

Heeeeeeeelp...

I'm not going to get Σταυωρος του Νοτου into shape unless someone lends a hand... The posted translation is full of holes... :confused:  please!!

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"Aide-toi et le ciel t'aidera" (help yourself and heaven will assist you - a French proverb).

Yesterday night I went to that Papazouglou concert and came home with an artistically done and incredibly cheap book of Kavvadias poems plus Dutch translations...

The book itself is a really funny object, nice thick paper, the pages have come off the printing press and been folded and bound, but not cut - very old-fashioned, very nice.

But slightly maddening! when I found it on the sales stand of "Het Griekse Eiland" in the entry of the concert hall, of course I wanted to look up Σταύρος του Νοτού at once, and it was hidden in a folded page... So I looked up Θεσαλονίκη instead, and what should I find but an error! (Hokwerda has translated Υραδάρεις with 'taking a sounding', meaning to measure the depth of the water - but then, he didn't have Gazakas' uncle to help - it's probably the only mistake in the whole book :confused: ).

So I had a good chuckle, asked the price (expecting it to cost a fortune, it looked so artistic), found it as cheap as photocopies, and bought it... then sat on the stairs with a cigarette and dug up my old swiss army knife to slash my way to that poem... And got lost in it, drowned in it, till the bell called us to the show...

So: I will post a revised edition in a minute!

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With many thanks to mr. Hero Hokwerda... at last a translation I dare post with some confidence!

Southern Cross

Music: Thanos Mikroutsikous

Lyrics: Nikos Kavvadias

The Garbi wind was whipping up the waves.

we were bending, the two of us, over the map;

you turned and said to me that by March

you would have entered different latitudes.

On your chest [there is] a coolie's tattoo,

that, however much you burn it, does not think of disappearing.

They say that you have loved her [once]

during an attack of black fever.

On watch beside a bald headland

and the Southern Cross [overhead] among the spars.

You clutch a Komboloi made of coral

and tirelessly chew bitter coffee beans.

Alpha Centauri, one night

with the astrolabe , I pulled it down.

you spoke to me in a deathly voice

beware the stars of the South

Sometime, once, under that same sky

you spent three months in a row

with the captain's half-caste [woman]

[taking] every night a lesson in steering a true course.

In a trade post in Nossi Bé

you  pulled out two shillings for that knife,

one day, at noon, on the Line,

[when it was] flashing like a lit-up lighthouse

Down there on the shores of Africa

The years pass by now that you are asleep

The beacons, you don't remember them no longer,

nor the lovely Sunday sweet.

Notes for the technical terms:

Spars: the masts of a ship and their cross-pieces.

Astrolabe: the instrument used to sight the height of sun, moon or star above the horizon.

Nossi Be: a small island in the Indian Ocean, north-west of Madagascar, to which it belongs.

The Line: the Equator. The sailors' word for it is similar in many languages, such as Greek (λινία), Dutch (Linie), French (Ligne) and English (Line).

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NIkola, and all of you who know Greek well enough,

(well, it's a long time I was the last time in this part of Forum, but we were etsi kai allios all in Zygos..._)

please, help: Ekeinos itan monos (from "Gia ta tragoudia kai ego ftaio): what the text is exactly about? I understand it etsi kai etsi, but still I can't understand the general meaning - so please, help me  with it!

Thanks!

Olga

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The song is dedicated to the memory of Alekos Panagoulis. He tried to assassinate the dictator, went to jail (where he suffered a lot) and later after the dictatorship he was killed in a so-called car accident, but actualy they say he was murdered..

Read all about it in gruesome detail in the book by his lover, the famous italian journalist Oriana Fallaci: Un Uomo (in English: A Man). Far too good, that book.

Also the song Kokkino Triantafyllo was dedicated to him.

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Thanks, Niki!

And, sorry if I put that topic to the false drawer, I somewhere can't get well to the older topics in this part of Club, but just one thing I got now, what the origin of the Greek word "ο ντουνιας" can be. THe Egyptians call Kairo "Umm el Dunia" - the Mother of the World....

NIki, please, would you translate for me this "Ekeinos itan monos" and some of the other things from "Gia ta tragoudia"? "O Sarantapixos"? Please!!!!

Olga

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just one thing I got now, what the origin of the Greek word "ο ντουνιας" can be. THe Egyptians call Kairo "Umm el Dunia" - the Mother of the World....

"el Dunia", or rather, "a-d-dunia" (the article is sort of glued to the word in Arabic) is probably not of Arabic origin (einai akliti lexi sta aravika). It means "o kato kosmos". I know the word does exist in Turkish. Let's ask Sarper about it...

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just one thing I got now, what the origin of the Greek word "ο ντουνιας" can be. THe Egyptians call Kairo "Umm el Dunia" - the Mother of the World....

"el Dunia", or rather, "a-d-dunia" (the article is sort of glued to the word in Arabic) is probably not of Arabic origin (einai akliti lexi sta aravika). It means "o kato kosmos". I know the word does exist in Turkish. Let's ask Sarper about it...

You know it right Francois;the word "dunya" does exist in Turkish :blush: It means "world".But it's in fact an Arabic word in origin, not a Turkish one :(  :D

S Gursu :(

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The Greek dictionary (KPIAPA) says it's a Turkish word, but I don't trust this dictionary very much. Maybe it's Persian, as it can't be Arabic (the structure of the word is not Arabic at all - I have talked about such words with a Tunisian colleague of mine. He thinks it's a very interesting issue).

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Francois,Olga;

My Turkish-Turkish dictionary,publicated by The Turkish Language Society(TDK), says that "dunya" (actually it's dόnya in Turkish) is an Arabic word in origin.

What's more;The Turkish edition of Grand Larousse also says so :D

The Greek dictionary (KPIAPA) says it's a Turkish word, but I don't trust this dictionary very much.

It's not surprising for me to hear that :D ...

Turks and Greeks have lived together for centuries and as a certain result of this fact there are so many common words in both languages (Turkish and Greek) :music: For this reason the editors of your dictionary might have thought that "dunya" could be a Turkish word :D  :D

S Gursu

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Thank you Sarper for the precious information. I must now understand why the word looks and sounds so strange in Arabic!

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Let's get this back on topic.

Here are the translations, formatted as a printable do-it-yourself cd-booklet. Good luck with it!

Thanks Geeske, it is really great! You have been the key in that issue, not to mention that without your work we would probably still be discussing about the title...  :D

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